Health

There are Australian who choose not to drink … .

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I have found some really interesting article which stated that some south Australian choose not to drink for various different reason as such

“I felt a lot of pressure, like a nerd really, because I wasn’t doing the same thing as my friends.

This is one of the social pressure sentence that you would get from young adult or even in teenagers. Many aiming to socialize but sometimes peer pressure is a matter so please non drinkers stay open mind and the choices you makes to express your self.

“I figure if I am going to have a lot of calories, why have alcohol. I’d rather a nice dessert.”

That’s sentences would get attention from girls ? to all drinkers > you might wanna see how many calories in your favorite alcohol drink please do so >>> http://www.drinkaware.co.uk/check-the-facts/health-effects-of-alcohol/appearance/calories-in-alcohol

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Alcoholic drinks are high in calories particularly common beverages such as beer and cocktails. However, by cutting back on the amount you drink, it can significantly help to reduce your calorie intake.

It can be useful to know that many alcoholic brands now have ‘light’ low alcohol alternatives containing less calories. Some ‘light’ wines have under 80 calories in a 175ml glass compared to 140 calories in the same measure of 13% ABV wine.

The article can be read through :http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/some-sober-thinking/story-e6frea83-1226533190382

 

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Alcohol in Australia society

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Recently, I have found some really interesting article on Australian culture based on drinking issue through the interview of Milton Lewis

The article can be found on -http://www.dulwichcentre.com.au/alcohol-in-australia.html

ently, I have found some really interesting article on Australian culture based on drinking issue through the interview of

There are some really interesting point that I want to share, as there are a changes in alcohol drinking habit among Australia from the past. In the present now, Australia alcohol drinking average are falling which means that young generation nowadays becoming to acknowledged the negative affected of alcohol. However, there are still some group of young adult who think that drinking alcohol is cool, or social pressure where every of their friends are drinkers.

Moreover, in Australian culture there has been a change since the 1960s with the introduction of a wine culture and a move to integrate alcohol with food. To drink in moderation, with food, as part of a pleasurable activity that doesn’t necessarily have the purpose of getting drunk, is a new trend. It may seem pretty basic but this development does seem to have happened with some degree of significance over the last 150 years.

Thus, It does seem that alcohol drinking are a trend but would it necessary for people to drink just to socialized ? there still any other activities that they could experiences in order to have some fun with their friends .. and I wish many drinkers could possibly find some other activities to be socialized other then just drinking alcohol 🙂 ps, stay clean life everyone .. ..

So non-drinkers stand up and be proud :)

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So non-drinkers, be proud to tell people you don’t drink. Remember your reasons for your choice. Small subtle changes to your approach to your social and business life can totally wipe out any issues (relating to your alcohol abstinence). For instance, if you are at a networking event where alcohol is served, instead of feeling uncomfortable, use your non-drinking as a subtle conversation starter, que a designated driver joke or so and off you go. With your social life, ensuring you have a few non-drinker friends in your group means you can easily steer social events to a non-drinking environment.

What reasons do you have for not-drinking? What ‘coping’ techniques do you have? I’d be Interested to hear your reasons and experiences.

Thank you The author Mukhlis Mah (guest post)  is in his third year of a Geochemistry degree  at UNSW and is president of the Islamic Awareness Forum of UNSW (www.iafunsw.org)